HKNIC - Radiation Releases
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Radiation Releases

How are releases controlled

Released activity must comply with compulsory requirements, and especially:
annual limits for both liquid and gaseous effluents
maximum weekly amount for gaseous release
maximum daily amount for liquid releases after complete dilution in seawater
[ Radioactive Releases ]  Cumulative Gaseous Releases
Purification work on the primary cooling system was carried out during the outage for planned refuelling and overhaul of Unit 2, therefore a relatively higher level of gaseous halogen release was recorded in November 2011.
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.
 

Annual Regulatory Limits (since 2013)

Noble Gas 700TBq     Halogen 25GBq
Aerosols 3.8GBq        Tritium 24TBq
Carbon-14 2.2TBq
Cumulative Gaseous Releases since January
[ Radioactive Releases ]  Cumulative Liquid Releases
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.
Note: In line with latest PRC regulations, Carbon-14 is included as one of the regulated quantities in the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of Daya Bay from 2013. Carbon-14 is a radioactive form of carbon, it is found in nature and in trace amount in living matters. Carbon-14 is weak in radioactivity compared to most of the radionuclides associated with the reactor. For reference, the World Health Organisation advises to keep Carbon-14 concentration within 100 Bq/litre in drinking water.

Annual Regulatory Limits (since 2013)

Tritium 225TBq     Carbon-14 300GBq
Other Radionuclides 130GBq
Cumulative Liquid Releases since January